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Muscle Mass Gaining: A Benefit to Your Body and Metabolism Process

  • Carried out correctly, weight training can improve strength, muscle tone and bone density.
  • There may be circumstances in which too much body muscle mass might be a concern.
  • In order to gain muscle, your training must be effective, but rest and nutrition are equally important.


Resistance training, or weight training is very often an important element in any fitness program or weight loss regime. However, is there a danger from gaining too much body muscle mass? Will you bulk up too much if you start to lift weights? This is a concern of many, particularly women, who are new to resistance training and do not want to look like a body builder.

The first thing to say is that resistance training brings many benefits. Carried out correctly, weight training can improve strength, muscle tone and bone density. These are all physical features that tend to decline as you get older, and therefore weight training can help to delay the effects of aging, and may prevent the onset of serious conditions such as osteoporosis. As part of a weight loss regime, resistance training can be highly effective. Muscle tissue is denser that fat tissue. Put simply, a handful of muscle will weigh more than a handful of fat. As a result, muscle requires more blood in order to keep it supplied with oxygen and other nutrients. Muscle tissue therefore burns more calories than fat, even when it is at rest.
Improving lean muscle can therefore have an extremely beneficial effect on your metabolism, which in turn can be very effective in achieving weight loss, and in maintaining a healthy weight.

There may be circumstances in which too much body muscle mass might be a concern. However, for the vast majority of trainers this will not be significant. Building a high level of muscle mass requires specialist training and nutrition over a prolonged period of years. In other words, you do not build muscle over night, and if you find that your lean muscle gain is too much, an adjustment in training and diet should bring the desired results.

In order to gain muscle, your training must be effective, but rest and nutrition are equally important. If you wish to lose weight, you must be in calorie deficit, that is to say, you must consume less calories than you burn. Similarly, in order to gain weight, including muscle mass, you must be in calorie surplus, so that the body has protein available with which to repair and develop. Clearly, if you do not rest a sufficient amount to maintain a calorie surplus, or to allow your body to recover from the rigors of hypertrophy training, muscle mass development may stall.

These types of principles can be employed to your benefit if you are concerned about gaining too much body muscle mass. Do not ignore resistance training, but concentrate also on cardiovascular training such as running, rowing or cycling. Also monitor your diet to ensure that you are not in calorie surplus that will promote weight gain.

The benefits of weight training are manifold to almost all ages. Significant muscle mass takes years to develop, so concerns about transforming your physique can be put to one side as you will notice only subtle differences as you begin resistance training. As you develop your strength and physique, you will be able to alter your program and diet so that you are better placed to achieve your physical goals.

The information supplied in this article is not to be considered as medical advice and is for educational purposes only.

2 Responses to “Muscle Mass Gaining: A Benefit to Your Body and Metabolism Process”

  1. 1
    Marie Says:
    Tell me about it! I almost had a heart attack when I started putting on muscle. Glad to know I don't have to worry.
  2. 2
    Anne Says:
    Another thing we girls have to remember is that muscle really does weigh more than fat. I think a lot of women get spooked with weight training because they think they're putting on weight.