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What to Do if You Have Leg Blood Clots?

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  • Symptoms of blood clots in the legs
  • What to do if you think you have

Leg Blood Clots

When you have a blood clot embedded in a vein within your thigh, lower leg or in your pelvis, it is known as deep vein thrombosis. Blood clots form and block or reduce the flow of blood through the veins of the legs, which circulate blood from the extremities back to the heart. Such a blockage can cause swelling, pain or a feeling of increased warmth in the leg that is affected.

The blood clots that form in the veins of the legs can also cause irritation or inflammation, and this is known as thrombophlebitis. Severe complications can occur with deep vein thrombosis if a clot that has formed in the vein breaks free, or embolizes. The clot can then travel through the bloodstream in the vein, and can cause blood vessels to become blocked, for example in the lungs (known as the pulmonary arteries). This is known as a pulmonary embolism, and such a condition can cause difficulty in breathing, and may even lead to death, depending on the severity of the blockage.

Identifying Deep Vein Thrombosis

can manifest themselves in the affected leg, particularly when a clot breaks free and causes an obstruction in the blood flow, causing inflammation. Symptoms may include the gradual onset of pain in the affected leg, redness and swelling. The affected leg may also be warm to the touch, and the pain in your leg may become worse whilst bending your foot. You may also experience leg cramps, particularly at night, and you may experience some whitish or bluish discoloration of the skin. However, many people who actually have deep vein thrombosis may not actually experience any symptoms as a result of the condition.

What To Do

If you have any reason to suspect that you may have a blood clot, call your doctor or healthcare provider immediately. Although a clot in the veins of the legs may resolve itself, the consequence are potentially life-threatening, and include pulmonary embolism heart attack and stroke. The potential consequences are serious enough that immediate medical attention is warranted and necessary. In fact, your doctor may instruct you to go to the hospital immediately, particularly if you have swelling or leg pain coupled with any other risk factors.

You should call 911 if you suspect you have a deep vein thrombosis, and in particular if you experience shortness of breath, chest pain, any difficulty in breathing, faintness or any other sign or symptom that might concern you.

Prescription medication is often necessary to properly treat deep vein thrombosis. The patient should see a doctor or health care professional for an accurate diagnosis and treatment.

In order to improve comfort and to lower the risk of any clots breaking free (embolizing), take the following simple measures:

• When you are seated, keep the affected leg elevated.
• Try to avoid sitting or lying for a prolonged period.
• In order to relieve any pain, apply moist, warm heat to the area.

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The information supplied in this article is not to be considered as medical advice and is for educational purposes only.

3 Responses to “What to Do if You Have Leg Blood Clots?”

  1. 1
    K.Seshadri Says:
    You are right, the medical profession by and large is neither professional nor worry about their ethical responsibility. They treat patients as just material pieces to be dictated to and get done with, after collecting their fees for irresponsible work. One way to tackle this, which I do for my family is this. I educate myself on the problem from the internet ( it is a taxing work, especially when you consider after all you are going to pay to the doctor his fees), and when I deal with the doctor and cross check as he diagnoses and suggests treatment. Doctors certainly dont like it for obvious reaons, but atleast they get alert and that is the way you push them to be more in-depth and complete in their diagnosis and treatment. It is a tough situation, but the more you help yourself, the rewards you reap are quite high and you minimize risk. After all it is your life. Doctors only watch the production line, prescrible, collect the fee and move to the next patient. Gone are the days when they really cared. My family doctor is an exception though. He is God. Seshadri
  2. 2
    GWENNIE Says:
    I HAD BEEN COMPLAINING TO MANY DOCTORS ABOUT PAIN IN MY LEGS; ESPECIALLY IN THE LEFT ONE. ALL THE DOCTORS WOULD DO WAS SEND ME TO PHYSICAL THERAPY AND/OR HAVE INJECTIONS IN MY KNEES. I HAD TO GO INTO THE HOSPITAL FOR MENIURES (VERTIGO) AND KIDNEY FAILURE AND CONTINUE TO ASKED THE NURSES AND DOCTOR THERE TO CHECK FOR BLOOD CLOTS IN MY LEGS. THEY FINALLY DID AN ULTRASOUND AND FOUND THE CLOTS PUT ME ON MEDICATION AND SENT ME HOME WHEN THE KIDNEY FAILURE WAS CONTROLLED. THEY TOOK ME OFF THE BLOOD THINNER 6 MONTHS LATER ONLY FOR ME TO BE BACK IN EMERGENCY WITH BLOOD CLOTS IN MY GROIN AREA AND BLOOD CLOTS (SUPPOSENLY DEAD) IN MY LEGS. WHAT IS WRONG WITH THE MEDICAL PROFESSION? WHY MUST I INSIST ON THEM DOING THEIR JOB AND THE JOB IS STILL NOT DONE THOROUGHLY. NO ATTORNEY WILL TAKE MY CASE AGAINST ANY DOCTOR SO I AM STUCK WITH DEALING WITH THESE ISSUES. WHAT DO YOU SUGGEST ABOUT DEALING WITH THESE CLOTS AND MEDICAL ATTENTION? THANKS.
  3. 3
    Ben Says:
    It just goes to show you that you can have a serious condition and not even know it. I know a lot of people who complain of leg problems that are similar to the symptoms you described here. They are generally older people, and so I suppose aging is the suspect. But obviously just about anyone can develop a blood clot in the legs, especially if they don't exercise enough or have other circulation problems. Thanks for an informative article, including what to do if you have a blood clot.

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