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How Ruptured Blood Vessels Occur

Ruptured Blood Vessels

  • may be startling but they’re usually not serious. are fairly common
  • It’s caused when a clot forms and makes the blood vessel bulge from the added pressure. Gradually the vessel is weakened and it breaks
  • Blood vessels in the eye are especially small so they’re easier to rupture
  • If you have ruptured blood vessels often, contact your doctor because this could be a sign of high blood pressure


Ruptured blood vessels in the eye can be frightening but in most cases are not very serious. Actually ruptured blood vessels in the eye are relatively common. However, repeated occurrences can be a warning sign of more serious problems that should be evaluated by a doctor. Ruptured blood vessels can happen anywhere in the body with sometimes deadly results. However, when they happen in the eye are fairly benign. They can happen by sneezing, coughing, or extreme physical exertion.

Ruptured blood vessels happen when a clot forms in the blood vessel. As blood passes by the clot it causes the blood vessel itself to bulge from the added pressure. When the blood vessel becomes weakened it can eventually break open, causing blood to escape. This can happen in both small blood vessels and large arteries. A ruptured blood vessel in the eye is when this occurs in the small blood vessels of the eye. The result is either a red spot or redness throughout the whole eye. These small blood vessels in the eye are susceptible to rupture because of their size.

Dangerous blood vessels mostly occur in the larger vessels and they are a result of a damaged blood vessel. These ruptured blood vessels can cause a pulmonary embolism which can be fatal. When this occurs the clot lodges itself in the lungs and the lungs actually drown due to the damage they cause in the lungs.

Damaged blood vessels that occur in the arteries of the neck or head in the main cause of strokes. When the blood clot breaks free it travels directly to the brain, depriving the brain of oxygen. When the brain does not get enough oxygen it starts shutting down other organs of the body as the brain tries to protect itself. Very quickly the lack of oxygen starts to cause the death of blood vessels in the brain, resulting in stroke or death if not treated quickly.

Small Blood Vessel
With small blood vessels the damage is quickly healed and is usually minor and happens frequently. What causes these damaged blood vessels? While most of the time harmless they can be an early indicator of high blood pressure which can lead to heart attack or stroke. Because of high blood pressure the body is more susceptible to blood vessel ruptures because of the speed at which the blood is flowing past the blockage. Think of a garden hose when you put your hand over the nozzle. The water comes out faster. The same thing happens with small blood vessels. It is important that if these damaged blood vessels occur frequently that you consult with your health care professional to determine whether you have high blood pressure. In most cases high blood pressure can be treated with a change of diet and lifestyle, or medicine.

Damaged blood vessels are not something to ignore if they keep happening. While mostly harmless they can be a sign of a more serious problem and it’s always better to be safe and make sure that it is of a harmless variety.

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The information supplied in this article is not to be considered as medical advice and is for educational purposes only.

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2 Responses to “How Ruptured Blood Vessels Occur”

  1. 1
    Kim Says:
    I've got a ruptured blood vessel in my eye for the first time in my life, but I'm still not sure exactly what caused it, as there doesn't seem to be any clear explanation - I didn't lift anything heavy and didn't cough or sneeze violently or anything. I generally eat healthy and excersise. What can it be?
  2. 2
    Jonathan Says:
    I've got a ruptured blood vessel in my eye for the first time in my life, but I'm still not sure exactly what caused it, as there doesn't seem to be any clear explanation - I didn't lift anything heavy and didn't cough or sneeze violently or anything. I generally eat healthy and excersise. What can it be?

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